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Yellow fruit pastille?

books dumb people
I remember in my early days on The Student Room, talking about asexuality and someone said:

I'd've thought that 'coming out' as asexual is roughly as useful as 'coming out' as a person who doesn't eat yellow fruit pastilles. I mean, someone might come out as gay so that other people who are gay know who he/she is and might approach them. If you're not interested in having sex then just don't have any (just as if you don't like yellow fruit pastilles you don't eat them). 

I replied: 

It is like that, except people talk about them all the time, offer them round and expect you to be as enthusiastic. Wouldn't you say you didn't like them too?

Thing is, I don't see it like that anymore - sex and the direct desire to make us want to have it is not just offered, talked and enthused about. 

If yellow fruit pastilles were a presumed adulthood rite, that to not want to eat them seen as unhealthy to the point of a doctor's visit, or to see a psychologist, that they are seen as a very important part of a relationship with a loved one, are discussed as a precious commodity that should not just be shared with strangers, described as a beautiful part of human experience, people who prefer the green ones are a huge political issue and make religious people angry, yellow fruit pastilles are used to sell everything you can think of, some people see society's treatment of yellow fruit pastilles as shocking lax or uptight and ridiculously restrictive, some people like writing whole books on the joys of eating them, some people say that you're betraying your body to not be eating them, many people believe that without eating them you are dooming your relationships and will be alone, that not liking fruit pastilles is due to not finding the 'right' yellow one (or maybe green?), that society expects and encourages the eating of yellow fruit pastilles, that not wanting to eat them is seen as 'unnatural', that not eating them denies your masculinity or femininity, that it was inconceivable for many health care professionals and everyday people that some people might just not be interested in them.

It's not just a disinterest. It's a huge social structure that just doesn't apply to us, and that means a lot.

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
love_pirate
17th Jul, 2008 01:27 (UTC)
Good gosh, what are these people so SCARED of?
sparks_eclectic
18th Jul, 2008 00:23 (UTC)
wow nicely argued, though i'm still totally and utterly bewildered as to how someone could even think that comparing asexuality to confectionary was even a viable argument. It just needlessly trivialises things and hurts the delicate logic section of my brain
emma_rainbow
18th Jul, 2008 00:38 (UTC)
Hehee, trust me, it was one of the more constructive comments that'd been made...
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )